A while ago, I posted a picture of a hand painted planter to my Instagram/Facebook and the feedback I received was amazing. I had been thinking about trying something new, doing new things and moving away from card making. One day, The Canadian came in from the shed declaring that he was throwing out some plant pots because they were too grungy, knowing that I am of a ‘waste not want not’ mentality, he asked if I had any ideas for them before they found their way to bin. Not one to turn down an opportunity to think outside the box, I grabbed them and got to work.

People have always commented on and ‘liked’ my work when I’ve shared it but this was different. All of a sudden, people who had previously been ambivalent about purchasing my art were now expressing interest in purchasing it.

I enjoyed the painting I had done on the large pot but it was a 10 hour investment and, at that moment, it wasn’t a viable option for selling.

I took some time, purchased little plant pots to paint, researched how to seal the paint on the pot and got to work.

I absolutely love the finished planters and I wasn’t sure about selling them because I adored them. The Canadian eventually persuaded me to sell them, so out came the camera and on came the click-click-click.

A few people have said that they’d love these plant pots but they’re not really into the idea of ‘planting’ things. These pots would be great for little succulents but they’re also good for:

  • hair slides, ties and clips
  • loose change and coins (thank you @dnam for that!)
  • nail polish, nail files, orange sticks
  • pens, crayons, colouring pencils (if, like me, you like having little pots of pens around the house)
  • little cat toys
  • jewellery
  • all manner of things!

Do you have any other ideas?

All these pots are available on sale now at The Lemon Hive Etsy Shop.

A few months ago, I came up with the brilliant idea that I should paint my walls in the style of Alisa Burke, the woman that is, to me, the definition of artistic bravery. Hand painted walls have always appealed to me. Ask my parents, they were rather perplexed when I used water paints to draw what was (in hindsight) a rather dreadful flower on my bright yellow bedroom wall. I loved it at the time, my dad did not when, years later, he had to do use three to four coats to cover it up.

As I’ve mentioned before, I like to do trial runs aka I am not as brave as Alisa Burke. If I’m honest, I’m not convinced I’m ever going to get around to completing this project. I hope I do! In the meantime, it was a useful motivational tool to get me to practice drawing flowers.

This one (the long picture above) was drawn on the back of a cereal box (I am nothing if not resourceful!). I used permanent marker simply because it was on hand. I also had to do it in stages because, actually, those fumes are lethal!

 This one I did with paints as I spoke to The Canadian about his day. This one is on the back of a pizza box. I didn’t enjoy how it soaked up the paint colours but I did enjoy how messy it was.

 I have been on such a recycling kick at the moment too! My friend bought be a gift in a pretty orange paper bag and now that paper bag has a painting of flowers on it. I discovered pretty quickly that I should draw more than I think I’ll need because once you fill in the background the foreground quickly becomes sparse.

 This final one was never completed. I got tired of breathing in sharpie marker fumes. It’s amusing to me how quickly I jump from one medium to another. One week it’s paint, the next it’s sharpies. Oh, my flighty mind!

After all of this I got a little brave and painted directly on the basement wall…I was really into it as well until I realised there was a grumpy spider watching me. That quickly put an end to any big aspirations I had.

Would you ever consider painting directly onto a wall? With the price of wallpapers it seems to be the only affordable option to having pretty walls.

mendhi inspired patterns and line drawing on the lemon hive

A while ago a friend requested I draw up a wedding card for her neice’s ‘fusion’ wedding. She gave me a copy of a thank you card her niece had sent her and told me the colours that she would be wearing as Aunt-of-the-bride.

turquoise, yellow and purple mendhi inspired painted patterns on the lemon hive

For most of my teens I was obsessed with the middle eastern, Indian and Pakistani design. I loved watching friends write Arabic and if the opportunity for Mendhi came up then I was there. The intricate designs and time consuming pattern appealed to me. I even spent the vast majority of my time absorbing as much as I could about the religious and cultural aspects of the countries, including the histories. Needless to say, I was really honoured and excited to be asked to design this piece of work.

These designs are all rough sketches and experiments with colours and patterns, but I am pleased with the results. Most of all, I’ve enjoyed the pleasure that comes from re-visiting topics, cultures and art that reignites passion and drive.

What do you think of these?

When I was in England, I found all of my old art journals and school work. I made the decision to lug them all back to Canada (paying surcharges for overweight luggage and all, I’m nothing if not dedicated!).

Over the years, I stopped drawing and painting and my ability suffered for it. It’s great to look back on these samples because if my name weren’t attached to them, I’m not convinced that I would believe them to be mine. Especially remembering how I used to rush through these projects because I saw them as a waste of time, funny how things change.

This project was kinda fun to do, there are a few others that I will share and some that I probably won’t. Do you have any idea what it is like to see what your 14 year old self  thought you looked like? Bizarre, that’s what.


The best part of reviewing these comes from reading my teacher’s comments. She used to write over a lot of my work and, quite often, the comments were far from encouraging. Yet, when I look through these sketchbooks I am entertained by my positive reaction to what I see. This alone has taught me that creating things is incredibly subjective. So long as I enjoy it, that’s really all that matters. I shall never be good at producing photograph like images but accepting that art allows for things to be ‘not perfect’ is part of the enjoyment, this calms the perfectionist in me. Good thing too, because that perfectionist is bloody annoying.


Looking through these pieces is great for reminding me of mediums and styles that I haven’t thought of in a long time. What do you think? Do you ever  look through old school books and projects to use as a measure of growth?